Products

Non-Timber Forest Products from Gopher Valley

Your purchase directly supports our conservation and education efforts. Seeds, spores, dye plants, mushroom logs, and other products are wild-collected and hand harvested.

Our forest is certified as responsibly managed by the Forest Stewardship Council™. We manage for wildlife habitat and biodiversity. Some products – for example oak mushroom logs – are the byproducts of conservation thinning.

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Please send us a message on the contact form to inquire about:

  • Oregon white oak mushroom logs – inoculated with edible mushrooms you can harvest for several years! (Shiitake, Oyster, Lion’s Mane) These logs are FSC® certified. We’ll be at the McMinnville Thursday farmer’s market August15 and 22, 2013. Logs and mushrooms are also available delivered in Western Oregon and Washington (roughly between Salem and Seattle along the I-5 corridor). You may arrange for pickup if you prefer. Order via the Paypal button on the home page. Logs are available anytime. Mushroooms available when they appear which is more or less on their own schedule.

NOTE: logs need to be kept outdoors in the shade so they get sufficient light and air. They need to be soaked about once a week or every two weeks, then weekly to start fruiting after a 2 month rest. Full instructions included with your log.

Please use the CONTACT FORM to request mushroom log FAQ’s and more info by email!

  • Native seeds and plants – if you are looking for a particular species of seed, pre-order before summer, so I can custom collect for you. I will have Camas (Camassia leichtlinii) bulbs available in the future, and seeds are usually plentiful, as are sword fern spores. Other seeds need to be collected on contract. See the “In Bloom in Gopoher Valley” page for species that may be available for small quantity custom collection.

Recent Posts

SNAGS: PART II

Some years ago, an arborist made a snag from one of our yard trees. Less than a decade has passed, but it is beginning to soften up, attracting he interest of some cavity-nesting birds. The nuthatch in this video spent several long days working on a couple of nest cavities, only to be run off by a northern flicker. After it made some test holes, the flicker decided it wasn’t the perfect place. Meanwhile, it is a favorite perch for the dawn chorus.

Equally interesting in the saga of this big snag, is the cascade of changes initiated by the sudden absence of a large tree. Resources – light is one of the most important – are limited in ecosystems. A large tree taking up air space and light has a big effect on surrounding vegetation. When it is gone, suddenly other trees and plants shift into high gear to take maximum advantage of the newly abundant resource. Birds and other wildlife are quick to make use of the changed environment too.

The tree-that-became-a-snag in our yard was suppressing nearby trees, and since it died, its neighbors have sprouted new growth from dormant buds on their trunks and branches (called epicormic branching). The thick new growth is fine for nest platforms and cover; Steller’s jays (Cyanocitta stelleri) are taking advantage. We watched a pair put together a nest in this limb thick with new growth (see video here). When trees snap off and lose branches naturally, the same thing occurs. This is why disturbances like wind and freeze damage create great habitat.

Thickened new growth makes better nest platforms

The tree pictured below was so close to its neighbor, that shaded lower branches died off. But new ones were able to re-sprout when exposed to sun. The tree has thick branching from dormant buds on the limbs, and epicormic buds on the trunk that exist for just this moment of newly available light.

Light gaps are important for regeneration in dense forests, and for diversity of species. This is where seedling trees, shrubs, annuals, and perennials get a start. Their blooms provide nectar for pollinators and food for animals.

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