Depauperate

1: falling short of natural development or size

2: impoverished depauperate fauna>

Origin of DEPAUPERATE

Middle English depauperat, from Medieval Latin depauperatus, past participle of depauperare to impoverish, from Latin de- + pauperare to impoverish, from pauper poor — more at poor

First Known Use: 15th century

Merriam-webster.com

This Dickensian word perfectly describes the flora and fauna of the modern world. We are now living among truly impoverished, pauperized landscapes.

In my Oregon Master Naturalist class this past week, we looked at this illustration of why the Willamette Valley biodiversity has plummeted since the mid-1850s:

Size and complexity of the Willamette River Channel over time

On the left is a diagram of the river as it was in 1854. You can see the narrowing, but from a physical point of view, consider the thousands of miles of edges, and surface area that were in the original system. The complexity was mind-boggling, and is the key to understanding the importance of river/wetland systems.

By the end of the century, the side channels and sloughs had been blocked or drained for farmland, the river was straightened for navigation and, significantly, an enormous quantity of large trees were removed from the channel. The result of these activities was a disconnection of the river from surrounding landscapes. The forests no longer contributed nutrients, shading and large woody debris. That impoverished the salmon support system of food and cover, as well as cool water and spawning gravel. Side channels and floodplains no longer dissipate the energy of floods, so Portland streets get inundated during big flood years. It is the equivalent of smashing up a finely tuned, complex and delicate mechanism. A fine clock for example.

The underground hydrology of the river systems is also very complex – with water entering and leaving the visible stream below and along the edges for some distance from the banks. The riparian zone is that belt along a river where you see green vegetation in a dry landscape, or where the tree type changes from conifers to mostly leafy deciduous trees. It can be 1.5 to 3 kilometers wide, yet most laws only protect less than a few hundred feet (sometimes only 50 feet) on either side of a stream.

The loss of wetlands is an enormous cost to us today, and surprisingly the loss from the tiny fraction of original wetlands continues at a rate of about 3% per year, despite laws to protect wetlands. (Previously, the loss was caused by farming, now the primary reason is development.)

Restoring the pauperized landscape: The replacement of lost function is the guiding principle in riparian and wetland ecological improvement projects, rather than “restoration” to an original state. People are just getting the hang of how to replace some elements of river/wetland systems so they perform their original services to wildlife and people, working around human structures to do so.

2 thoughts on “Depauperate

  1. Pingback: A Map Of Time, Time In Maps | GOPHER VALLEY JOURNAL

  2. Pingback: The good news… | GOPHER VALLEY JOURNAL

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